Unpack and repack a JAR file with all of its dependencies

Repacking an unpacked JAR is a little frustrating because of the folder structure

When unpacking with:

jar xvf JAR_NAME.jar

you get a JAR_NAME/ folder

To repack the JAR:

remove old jar

rm JAR_NAME.jar

get inside the folder

cd JAR_NAME

pack the jar referencing the parent folder

jar cf ../JAR_NAME.jar *

and you will end up with the JAR_NAME.jar in the parent folder, where the original was unpacked from, without the first folder level you would get if you had packed the folder itself.

Difference between ‘git pull’ and ‘git fetch’?

In the simplest terms, git pull does a git fetch followed by a git merge.

You can do a git fetch at any time to update your remote-tracking branches under refs/remotes/<remote>/.

This operation never changes any of your own local branches under refs/heads, and is safe to do without changing your working copy. I have even heard of people running git fetchperiodically in a cron job in the background (although I wouldn’t recommend doing this).

git pull is what you would do to bring a local branch up-to-date with its remote version, while also updating your other remote-tracking branches.

Git documentation: git pull

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/292357/what-is-the-difference-between-git-pull-and-git-fetch

MySQL Dump/Restore Stored Procedures and Triggers

mysqldump will backup by default all the triggers but NOT the stored procedures/functions. There are 2 mysqldump parameters that control this behavior:

—routines – FALSE by default
—triggers – TRUE by default

This means that if you want to include in an existing backup script also the triggers and stored procedures you only need to add the —routines command line parameter:

mysqldump <other mysqldump options> --routines outputfile.sql

Let’s assume we want to backup ONLY the stored procedures and triggers and not the mysql tables and data (this can be useful to import these in another db/server that has already the data but not the stored procedures and/or triggers), then we should run something like:

mysqldump --routines --no-create-info --no-data --no-create-db --skip-opt <database> > outputfile.sql

and this will save only the procedures/functions/triggers of the . If you need to import them to another db/server you will have to run something like:

mysql <database> < outputfile.sql

Access MySQL Without Password

For MySQL you can specify your user and password in local config file (.my.cnf). This file should be in your home directory (i.e. ~/.my.cnf).

.my.cnf:

[mysql]
user=user
password=password

How do you gunzip a file and keep the .gz file?

You’re looking for:

gzcat x.txt.gz >x.txt

The gzcat command is equivalent to gunzip -c which simply writes the output stream to stdout. This will leave the compressed file untouched. So you can also use:

gunzip -c x.txt.gz >x.txt

Note that on some systems gzcat is also known as zcat so run like this instead:

zcat x.txt.gz >x.txt